What Does it Mean to be Farsighted?

What does it mean to be farsighted (hyperopia)?

Before going into farsightedness, it helps to describe what normally happens when we see at distance and near if you are not hyperopic. Normally, a person who is wearing their correct prescription does not focus at all to see far away and then focuses a little bit to see up close.

In contrast, when you are farsighted, your eyes have to work/focus to see at a distance and then work even harder to see up close. Essentially this means the hyperopic eye is working unusually hard. Therefore, those with hyperopic prescriptions tend to be more prone to headaches, eye strain and fatigue with near work.

Does dilation affect farsighted people differently than nearsighted people?

Yes, it does. Farsighted people who are not corrected (with glasses or contacts) rely heavily on their focusing system for both distance and near. In addition to making the pupil larger, dilation temporarily disables the focusing system which means that a farsighted person will have blurry vision at distance and near while dilated in comparison to a nearsighted person. However, if a hyperopic person has their glasses or contacts, during dilation, the predominate effect will be on the near vision.

What can be done for the farsighted person?

Fortunately, hyperopia can be corrected for with glasses or contacts.

If you are experiencing a lot of eye strain, headaches or fatigue with near work, come see us at Salisbury Eyecare and Eyewear to see if glasses or contacts will alleviate your symptoms.

 

If you enjoyed this article about What it Means to be Farsighted, be sure to check our our article on Advantages and Disadvantages of Hyperopia.

 

A Little Bit About…

A Little Bit About…

Ashley Iketani-Castillo, OD, MS

Dr. Iketani is a Florida native who has a passion for managing ocular disease. She views each patient as a whole person and believes the eyes are a window to a patient’s systemic health. She also has a passion for fitting rigid lenses on patients with corneal disease to help them obtain their best vision.

Dr. Iketani graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry where she completed internships at the Hefner Veteren’s Affairs hospital in Charlotte, NC and The Metrolina Association for the Blind which focused on Low Vision rehabilitation. Prior to pursuing optometry, she obtained a Masters of Science which focused on developmental genetics and worked as a technician in a lab that researched breast cancer.

Dr. Iketani currently resides in Cincinnati where her husband is starting his pediatrician fellowship,with their two cats and baby boy.

Disclaimer

Information contained within this Web site is intended solely for educational purposes and is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your physician or other health care provider for any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies. By using this Web site, you agree to this Medical Disclaimer.

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205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

 

205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

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