The Late Mary Tyler Moore and Diabetic Retinopathy

The Loss of Mary Tyler Moore

In early 2017 we lost a prominent American figure, Mary Tyler Moore, at the age of 80. Many of us grew up watching her on television, but in addition to her extensive film career, Mrs. Moore advocated for several causes including diabetes. Type I diabetes is also juvenile diabetes and is a condition where the person does not make enough or makes no insulin and therefore has trouble regulating their blood sugars. In type 2 diabetes, the onset is usually later and it occurs when either the body does not make enough insulin or the body becomes resistant to the insulin it produces. These conditions have negative impacts on all systems of the body.
Mrs. Moore suffered from Type I diabetes and in 2014 she went public with the toll it had taken on her vision. According to friends, the disease had affected her eyes so much that she is ‘almost to the point of being unable to see.’

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy is damage to the retina seen in diabetics. This results when the blood vessels in the eye are exposed to elevated blood sugars for long periods causing the breakdown of the integrity of the blood vessels. As a result, the vessels bleed and there is reduced oxygen supply to the tissues.

How Can Diabetic Retinopathy Cause You to Lose Vision?

There are a few ways that diabetes can cause you to lose vision, but most commonly people will acutely notice a change in vision if there is swelling of the macula. The macula is a tissue in the eye that is responsible for your 20/20 vision. Macular swelling should be treated promptly by an ophthalmologist.
Other ways vision can be lost is general death of tissue resulting from poor blood supply after a prolonged period diabetic retinopathy, new blood vessels growing in the eye that cause blood to leak into the center of the eye or cause high eye pressure.

If I Have Diabetes How Can I Protect My Ocular Health?

Diabetics should get an annual dilated exam to monitor for early diabetic changes in the eye. If diabetic changes or noted, your doctor will either recommend treatment or watch your eyes more closely.

 

If you enjoyed this article about Mary Tyler Moore and Diabetic Retinopathy, be sure to check our our article on Diabetes and The Eye.

A Little Bit About…

A Little Bit About…

Ashley Iketani-Castillo, OD, MS

Dr. Iketani is a Florida native who has a passion for managing ocular disease. She views each patient as a whole person and believes the eyes are a window to a patient’s systemic health. She also has a passion for fitting rigid lenses on patients with corneal disease to help them obtain their best vision.

Dr. Iketani graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry where she completed internships at the Hefner Veteren’s Affairs hospital in Charlotte, NC and The Metrolina Association for the Blind which focused on Low Vision rehabilitation. Prior to pursuing optometry, she obtained a Masters of Science which focused on developmental genetics and worked as a technician in a lab that researched breast cancer.

Dr. Iketani currently resides in Cincinnati where her husband is starting his pediatrician fellowship,with their two cats and baby boy.

Disclaimer

Information contained within this Web site is intended solely for educational purposes and is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your physician or other health care provider for any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies. By using this Web site, you agree to this Medical Disclaimer.

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205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
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205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

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Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

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