Congratulations, you have had enough birthdays to experience Presbyopia?!

As a quick reminder, Presbyopia is a progressive change in the lens beginning in the early 40s, that progresses for about 15 years and then plateaus resulting in difficulty in seeing up close when corrected for at distance. What this essentially means is that now you need a separate type of prescription to see up close than you do far away. If you are one of those lucky people that never needed any prescription to see before, now you need one just to see up close.

Here are some options:

  • Bifocal: This is the type of lens that has a line in the lower portion. There is a near and a distance prescription but the downside is that there is not an intermediate prescription for arm’s length and computer distances. As a result, those who spend a lot of time on the computer may not prefer this type of correction
  • Progressive Addition Lenses (PAL): This is also called a ‘no-lined’ bifocal. The design begins with the distance prescription in the top and slowly changes from intermediate to near as you move your eyes to the bottom of the lens. Essentially, it is three glasses prescription in one lens. There are some differences between getting a PAL and normal single vision distance lenses. First, the design is key, meaning not all PALs are equal. The newer technologies/premium PALs are going to have a larger sweet spot for vision and will be easier to use. Another important part is the measurements. Although we would never advocate getting glasses online, this is especially true for a PAL where the measurements are key for success. Your best vision will be with a premium PAL that has been custom fit to you and your selected frame
  • Single vision glasses for near vision: This is a pair that is based on your distance prescription to maximize your vision up close. The upside is that you will have a wide field of view, but the downside is that you will have to remove them to look across the room or walk around. Having to remove your reading glasses regularly often results in damaging them and not having them when you need them.
  • Multifocal, Monovision and Modified Monovision Contact Lenses: This is a prescription that is customized to your needs using contact lenses. The goal of this system is to get you to function well throughout your day for driving, working on the computer and checking your phone. The upside is that you won’t need to wear glasses but you will still be able to function through most activities without needing reading help. The downside is that if you are going to read the small print, you may need to grab a pair of low-powered over-the-counter reading glasses to wear over them.

If you enjoyed this artice about Presbyopia, be sure to check our our article on The Aging Eye: Normal vs. Abnormal.

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A Little Bit About…

A Little Bit About…

Ashley Iketani-Castillo, OD, MS

Dr. Iketani is a Florida native who has a passion for managing ocular disease. She views each patient as a whole person and believes the eyes are a window to a patient’s systemic health. She also has a passion for fitting rigid lenses on patients with corneal disease to help them obtain their best vision.

Dr. Iketani graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry where she completed internships at the Hefner Veteren’s Affairs hospital in Charlotte, NC and The Metrolina Association for the Blind which focused on Low Vision rehabilitation. Prior to pursuing optometry, she obtained a Masters of Science which focused on developmental genetics and worked as a technician in a lab that researched breast cancer.

Dr. Iketani currently resides in Cincinnati where her husband is starting his pediatrician fellowship,with their two cats and baby boy.

Disclaimer

Information contained within this Web site is intended solely for educational purposes and is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your physician or other health care provider for any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies. By using this Web site, you agree to this Medical Disclaimer.

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205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

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