Fetty Wap’s Congenital Glaucoma

Fetty Wap is an American musician who is better known for his music, but some people have taken note of his left eye. According to the artist, “…when I was little I had gotten into a little accident and it gave me congenital glaucoma in both of my eyes. The doctor saved one, I was blessed to still have my vision. That’s it. That’s the story.”

In photos, Fetty Wap’s left eye doesn’t appear open fully and also I am unable to see the iris, pupil and cornea in any photos. This could be due to a combination of enopthalmos, sensory eye turn and/or ptosis. Both of these signs can be caused by a traumatic injury such as one that would lead to glaucoma.

What is glaucoma?

In a nutshell, glaucoma is when the pressure within the eye is too high for that particular person’s optic nerve and as a result there is loss of retinal nerve tissue leading to loss of side vision and reduced vision in the end stages. There are various types of glaucoma which may start at a young age as in congenital glaucoma and other types that affect adults. The most common type of glaucoma affects older adults. Glaucoma can result from an imbalance between eye pressure and tissue strength and some types of glaucoma result from poor outflow of eye fluid. Poor outflow of fluid can be due to inflammation, drainage structure anomalies, eye trauma or pathological conditions. No matter the source of the glaucoma, the end result is loss of side vision and eventual reduced vision.

What is Congenital Glaucoma?

The eye pressure drainage system does not develop properly leading to high eye pressure which damages ocular structures. Sometimes congenital glaucoma is associated with other systemic and ocular conditions. The result is enlarged corneas (clear part of eye), crippling light sensitivity, severely reduced vision and loss of side vision. Children with congenital glaucoma are born with this but it may not be detected until infancy or early childhood. Congenital glaucoma is aggressive and often requires multiple glaucoma medications and possibly surgery for management. These children often require low vision rehabilitation, high powered magnifiers, special sunglasses and electronic magnification to help them function.

What might have happened to Fetty Wap?

From what I have read, it seems that he had an ocular trauma resulting in traumatic glaucoma affecting his left eye much more severely than his right eye. Based on history and photos on the internet, it seems that his traumatic glaucoma happened at a very early age which is why some may refer to his condition as congenital. It is possible that he got glaucoma in both eyes but perhaps the effect to the right eye was minor enough to be managed prior to glaucomatous damage. As I mentioned before, in all photos, I could not see the iris and cornea of Fetty Wap’s left eye. There are several explanations which could contribute to the appearance of his eye today. One is that the injury caused a combination of a ptosis and enopthalmos. Ptosis is when the lid sags and enopthalmos is when the eyeball sinks back further into the eye socket. Another explanation is that he has a sensory eye turn due to loss of vision in that eye at such a young age. This occurs when the vision in one eye is so poor at a very young age that there is no stimulus for the brain to keep the eye straight so it drifts into a different position and stays there. The ptosis, sensory eye turn and enophalmos could all contribute to why we cannot see Fetty Wap’s entire left eye.

So, it sounds like Fetty had an accident as a young child but due to diligence of his parents and doctors, his vision in his right eye is perfect and he has been able to live a fulfilling life with many achievements.

Enjoy these rumored celebrity eye health blogs? Then you’ll really enjoy reading about Kristen Bell and her ‘lazy eye’.

A Little Bit About…

A Little Bit About…

Ashley Iketani-Castillo, OD, MS

Dr. Iketani is a Florida native who has a passion for managing ocular disease. She views each patient as a whole person and believes the eyes are a window to a patient’s systemic health. She also has a passion for fitting rigid lenses on patients with corneal disease to help them obtain their best vision.

Dr. Iketani graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry where she completed internships at the Hefner Veteren’s Affairs hospital in Charlotte, NC and The Metrolina Association for the Blind which focused on Low Vision rehabilitation. Prior to pursuing optometry, she obtained a Masters of Science which focused on developmental genetics and worked as a technician in a lab that researched breast cancer.

Dr. Iketani currently resides in Charlotte with her husband, a pediatric resident, their two cats and they are welcoming a baby boy in December 2018.

Celebrity Eye Health Blog Series Disclaimer

With all celebrities discussed in this series I am simply using the power of Google and reporting the rumors of their eye conditions. I am not certain if these celebrities have these eye conditions, and I have never seen their medical records or examined them myself. I am simply reporting on a personal interest of mine and describing what these conditions are. My comments do not reflect the personal history of the celebrity or inside knowledge of them or their rumored condition. - Dr. Ashley Iketani-Castillo

Disclaimer

Information contained within this Web site is intended solely for educational purposes and is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your physician or other health care provider for any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies. By using this Web site, you agree to this Medical Disclaimer.

205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
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205 E Council Street, Suite B
Salisbury, North Carolina 28144

Phone: (704) 310-5002
Fax: (704) 310-5003
kristin@salisburyeyecareandeyewear.com

 

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Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
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Hours:
Monday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
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